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ThermaCELL
Wildlife Research Center

Mathews Inc
60X Custom Strings
ATSKO

|

Making Trail Cameras Work For You

HEAD

Sponsored by:  Grubs Boots, ATSKO, Grim Reaper Broadheads and Spypoint Camera Systems.

By: Bruce Ryan   Pres. Ryan Outdoors

By: Bruce Ryan Pres. Ryan Outdoors

In a lifetime of hunting Whitetail Deer, I have witnessed nothing that changed the sport more than the advent of the Trail Camera. In the past, we hunters had to depend on fresh deer sign and the interpretation of that sign, as a major way of scouting for deer and any mature bucks that might be present. We learned to scout out food sources and the trails leading to and from these sources and bedding areas. Often we scouted sign that showed a nice buck was in our area, but could only guess at what that buck might look like.

The development and evolution of the trail camera changed all of this. When used correctly, we can now see photos of the deer in our areas, and keep better track of their daily habits. This includes different behavior and travel routes, as food sources change with the season and deer adjust their patterns relative to these changes.

Hunting Guide Sam Zirkle sets up his Spypoint Trail Camera while wearing Treeline 8.5 SP boots by Grubs Boots, sprayed with Scent Elimination spray.

Hunting Guide Sam Zirkle sets up his Spypoint Trail Camera while wearing Treeline 8.5 SP boots by Grubs Boots, sprayed with Scent Elimination spray.

In order to make the most of trail cameras there are a few things we as hunters must be aware of. My main objective is to learn more about my quarry, while not educating them on my presence. I like to use quality IR cameras, as they do not flash and alert the game to their presence. The newer camera systems that use no-glow or black lights are even better. The photos included in this article were all taken with what I think are the best trail cameras made today, Spypoint IR 10 cameras.

Day time shot.

Day time shot.

Low light shot or...

Low light shot or…

No light shot. You will always know what is moving in your area, and when.

No light shot. You will always know what is moving in your area, and when.

It is paramount that you are as scent free as possible and that you leave no scent evidence of your visit to check your camera. To make this possible I, and my staff, wear Grub’s Rubber bottom hunting boots. I insist on spraying these each trip with N-O-DOR Scent Elimination Spray from ATSKO. It is also important to wear rubber gloves while checking cameras and handling anything in the scouting area. I also like to spray down the camera with N-O-DOR after changing SD cards.

Hunting Guide Sam Zirkle makes sure no foreign scent remains on his Spypoint Camera and mount by spraying the area with

Hunting Guide Sam Zirkle makes sure no foreign scent remains on his Spypoint Camera and mount by spraying the area with N-O-DOR Scent Elimination Spray

Trail Cameras are fun and a great way to learn much about the wildlife in your area. I like to set my cameras at food sources or on main trails leading to them. When the oaks start to drop acorns, everything changes here in WV and I start looking for acorns from white oaks and set my cameras relative to these. I also start to plan for stand sites for the next few months, as acorns will be the main food source during this time.

As you can see from some of the photos, I have some good bucks and bears to match wits with this season. Gotta love these cameras!

BRUCE-VERT0smallBruce Ryan is a life-long outdoorsman and bowhunter and the President of Ryan Outdoors, a marketing agency specializing in the outdoor field.


Share Your Comments or Opinion Below, Thanks

6 Comments for “Making Trail Cameras Work For You”

  1. […] outfitter, he once offered horseback hunts in wilderness areas. His experience can help you avoid trail camera blunders that can actually cost you big […]

  2. I had a trail camera that the lenses cracked and broke when I touched it from the heat has that ever happened

  3. I never scent block.. My smell is all over my woods. I walk through them 3-2 times a week. I don’t even wear camo. The deer and other animals are so used t our scent that it doesn’t bother them at all. I have a special secret feed, I mix by hand (no gloves), that they absolutely love. All I’m saying is that you don’t need to buy all the extra “special” deer corn, deer cane, scent killer. all that other useless stuff. The only thing I bought extra is my trail cam, and even wasn’t to expensive, under $150. Primos Blackout Truth Cam. The feed mix I use is the same that I feed to my horses in the winter, so I’m not buying anything extra there. The reason I know this mixture works better then deer corn is that the deer would jump the fences to my pastures and eat along side of the deer. Mind you, these are not urban deer used to people. They see a person and run. Plus our property is rural wooded areas and timber lands..

  4. I meant along side of my horses..

  5. If you’re still switching SD cards you are behind times…
    Go out and buy a mini iPad, an otterbox case, and the camera connect cable from apple.
    You can pull the SD card, hook it up, upload all photos, and wipe the card clean, in no time. If you choose you can look through all the photos while there and make decisions and decide if you need to move the camera angle, height, or location… This will save you time and you don’t have to get a bunch of SD cards…
    Also, I use a Cuddeback attack IR and Bushnell trophy cams and have spooked game with the IR glow so I would recommend the blackouts, I seldom wear rubber boots, and have never worn gloves or used scent shit and have never had an issue, just saying, food for thought

  6. […] outfitter, he once offered horseback hunts in wilderness areas. His experience can help you avoid trail camera blunders that can actually cost you big […]

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