This time of the year most of the “deer experts” tell us that using deer protein pellets is mandatory if you’re gonna have big racked bucks in your hunting area. Actually, I think the “big rack” part is mainly hype drummed up by manufactures of the protein pellets they make to sell us deerhunters. If you doubt that, take a look at the picture of that humongous whitetail buck on the front side of the bag of pellets, and ask yourself, “How often have I seen a buck like that where I deerhunt?”

In the photo below two deer are zeroing in on my protein feeder this morning.

whitetail deer pictures by Robert Hoague

A short distance away a pair of bucks and does come to the edge of the woods to check things out.

whitetail deer pictures by Robert Hoague

Meanwhile, the two deer walking toward the protein feeder turn out to be a young buck and a doe.

whitetail deer pictures by Robert Hoague

The protein feeder is perfectly engineered to gravity feed more pellets to replace the ones that are eaten.

whitetail deer pictures by Robert Hoague

Two more bucks come up and next thing we know three deer are scarfing down the deer pellets.

whitetail deer pictures by Robert Hoague

The pellet feeder is perfectly designed so deer can stick their noses, and mouths, in the open space and enjoy the tasty and expensive pellets.

whitetail deer pictures by Robert Hoague

Now lets go back to what I said in the first paragraph. Was I saying that deer pellets do not work?

No, I wasn’t.

They do something very specific that helps your deer herd. They provide the deer with vitamins, minerals and nutrition that make the deer extra healthy. And that’s not only the bucks, it’s the does and fawns too.

NEXT let’s talk more about the pellet thing and answer these questions: Do deer always take to the pellets? Is the nutrition value of the pellets equal? Why is there a difference in price? And when should you do it?